Master of Science in Homeland Security course descriptions

HLS-500: TERRORISM AND HOMELAND SECURITY IN THE U.S. (3 credits)
This course examines the phenomenon of the term terrorism as it relates to the United States domestically as well as internationally from the time of the Cold War to the present day. Emphasis is placed upon the identification, comparison and understanding of the various definitions of terrorism and the perpetrators of these acts, along with the various aspects of terrorism and homeland security which are required knowledge of anyone who are scholars, practitioners, researchers and scholar/practitioners in the field and discipline of terrorism and homeland security. The student will be exposed to the nexus between terrorism and homeland security as it relates to homeland security strategy, assessment, evaluation, preparation, responses, and recovery actions and mechanisms relating to terrorism and homeland security. There will be a focus on the importance of coordination of various assessments, plans, strategies and implementation of plans of action involving local, county, state, federal and international responses pertaining to terrorism and homeland security.
HLS-501: NATURAL DISASTERS (3 credits)
This course will investigate a wide range of natural disasters, and develop appropriate plans for mitigating the problems. Natural disasters include a wide range of issues from outbreak of diseases, floods, earthquakes, fires, and tornados, and may include secondary disaster situations such as chemical spills, nuclear incidents and power outages.
HLS-510: PROTECTING THE HOMELAND: BALANCING SECURITY AND LIBERTY (3 credits)
The course examines the USA PATRIOT Act and will examine why the government and the public began to question and scrutinize the country’s intelligence mechanisms, and national security structure and procedures. During this course there will be an opportunity to examine the creation, development, and organizational structure of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). As part of the examination of DHS, there will be opportunities to also examine entities such as the Transportation Safety Administration, which was established after 9/11. This course will also examine other developments due to the attacks on 9/11 such as the detention and torture of “enemy combatants” in Iraq and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and consider whether the nation’s security needs justify the consequent restrictions on U.S. freedoms.
HLS-611: INTERNATIONAL LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES (3 credits)
This course examines statutory and constitutional legal principles and their relation to the design and implementation of national and international strategies related to homeland security in both the domestic and global arenas. Emphasis will be on policy-making.
HLS-615: DOMESTIC AND GLOBAL INTELLIGENCE FOR SECURITY MANAGEMENT (3 credits)
Global Security managers are both producers and consumers of intelligence. This course acquaints students with the concepts and practices involved in the process of collecting, analyzing, and evaluating intelligence and in managing the intelligence cycle, as well as the influence of intelligence in shaping homeland security decision making at the international, federal, state, and local levels. It examines the structures, roles, and interactions of foreign and domestic intelligence communities, the intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities of law enforcement and private sector entities, and the use of intelligence processes to support security investigations, planning, and policy formulation. Based in a case study approach, students in this course will develop an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work, as well as an appreciation for the ethical, Constitutional, and civil liberties issues involved.
HLS-620: PREPAREDNESS: PREVENTION & DETERENCE (3 credits)
This course focuses on how strategic planning, incident management and intelligence techniques combine to provide the necessary foundation for anti-terrorism preparedness. Topics covered include critical infrastructure protection, National Incident Management System, data collection and analysis techniques, threat and vulnerability assessments, information sharing, resource planning, intelligence failures, terrorism prevention and deterrence.
HLS-625: TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION SECURITY (3 credits)
This course will investigate advanced topics in computer security and forensics.  Included will be topics such as cryptography, steganography, automatic intrusion detection, firewalls, and vulnerability scanning, and advanced pattern matching as well as statistical techniques.  This course will investigate cyber terrorism and cybercrime, and how this differs from computer security.  Technological advancements that are on the cutting edge present opportunities for terrorists, and it is necessary to explore the current domestic and international policies relative to critical infrastructure protection and methods for addressing issues. 
HLS-630: PROTECTING TNE HOMELAND: RESPONSE & RECOVERY (3 credits)
This course focuses on the many response and recovery efforts possible for the various actors in homeland security, both in the public and private sectors. The concept of planning is addressed with a focus on implementation, testing and evaluation. Students will discuss how best to lead, communicate and coordinate in response and recovery efforts across jurisdictions and agencies. Technology and information gathering, as tools for planning and responding, are explored. Both government and law enforcement efforts and Business Continuity Planning are studied.
HLS-640: ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE FOR SECURITY PROFESSIONALS (3 credits)
Using case studies and simulations related to emergency events (a terrorist attack, a natural disaster, a pandemic), this course focuses on management and finance aspects of disaster management.
HLS-610: THE PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY OF DISASTER (3 credits)
This course will determine how individuals react in disasters and what factors determine behaviors.  This course examines the traumatic consequences of terrorism and disasters upon individuals and groups, as well as the individual and collective social behaviors that often occur as a result of these events. The course examines a range of psychological and social issues related to terrorism and disaster, including theories of trauma, trauma prevention strategies and crisis intervention, the impact of trauma upon first responders and those directly exposed to terrorism or disasters, the psychological goals of terrorism, and post-traumatic stress. Individual and group dynamics and reactions are examined.
HLS-645:  PANDEMICS, BIOTERRORISM, AND BIOSECURITY (3 credits)
Biological threats, proliferation of biological weapons, and bioterrorism present challenges to homeland and national security, and create legitimate concerns about our Nation’s ability to prevent biological attacks. Yet agencies have deeply embedded professional norms and organizational cultures, which resist change. Students in this course will explore the obstacles to implementation and strategies to overcome them.
HLS-650: CAPSTONE IN HOMELAND SECURITY (6 credits)
The capstone project is a comprehensive analysis of a significant incident, case problem, or policy dilemma related to an agency selected by the student. Each student is required to develop a proposal identifying and describing the agency and the problem to be addressed, the data to be collected and analyzed, a list of viable alternatives, and a set of evaluation criteria to be used in selecting the best course of action to resolve the problem. The objective of the capstone project is to produce a comprehensive analytical report that could be used in solving an actual organizational or policy-related problem.